Why not do the big, hard things to change the world?

So screw the little things. Here are 10 big, difficult, world-changing concepts we can get behind:

These hard things have to do with: Nuclear weapons, diet, women, poverty, transparency, green cities among others.

via Worldchanging: Bright Green: Earth Day: 10 Big, Really Hard Things We Can Do to Save the Planet.

Is self-organization or structure better for collaboration?

More structure can be better than more freedom to foster collaboration. Yet, it is not the goals or the processes a team leader needs to define. Rather, the roles of each team member need to be clarified so they are well understood by all.

The Biggest Mistake You (Probably) Make with Teams – Tammy Erickson – Harvard Business Review

Why don’t we ask more questions?

Very much in line with the quote by Martin von Hildebrand I posted a couple of days ago:

Too often in most businesses asking questions seems intrusive, as if you are trying to catch someone off guard or perhaps suspect they haven’t done their homework. That’s too bad, because far too many questions go unasked, and because of that far too many assumptions go unchallenged and far too many half-baked ideas are implemented.

via Thinking Faster: Asking the right questions.

Thanks to Martin (aka frogpond) for pointing me to this post.

Listen, embrace feedback and go viral

Viral effects are a form of feedback. Viral effects aren’t about “viral marketing”. They’re about the transmission of stuff from one actor to another — in a classic increasing returns pattern: 2 people, 4 people, 16 people, 256 people you can pick your own exponent. That stuff can be flu bugs — or better stuff, like information, reputation, money…anything. The sky’s the limit in a hyperconnected world.

via The Age of Viral Feedback – Umair Haque – HarvardBusiness.org.