Education 3.0: Learning by experimenting

An appeal to experimentation and prototyping in education by a 13-year old: This Is What Happens When A Kid Leaves Traditional Education

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Are we seeing a new type of doing business?

Interview with Rosabeth Moss Kanter from 2009

But here’s what makes me think the parade is growing: Companies that do not operate this way will not only lose the advantages of innovation, motivation, and public support, they will also have trouble being coherent and finding business opportunities.

via The Vanguard Corporation — HBS Working Knowledge.

Has shopping become more transparent?

A radical transparency about the ecological impacts may yet emerge from these efforts — and many in the business world are paying attention. A recent article in Harvard Business Review proclaims that sustainability has become an essential business strategy and the key driver of innovation. To be sure, there are large numbers of companies who resist — but they may yet join in, if markets shift toward brands that are more transparent about ecological footprints, creating a compelling business case.

via Radical transparency could lay bare the eco impact of our shopping | Environment | guardian.co.uk.

Nature and tech: Does that go together?

The book Technobiophilia: Nature and Cyberspace questions the either or approach we tend to have towards cyber-technology and nature. Do we have to live without technology to live a healthy and wholesome life? Do we have to cut out nature if our gadgets determine a large part of our lives?

Technobiophilia: nature and cyberspace | Sue Thomas.

Why not do the big, hard things to change the world?

So screw the little things. Here are 10 big, difficult, world-changing concepts we can get behind:

These hard things have to do with: Nuclear weapons, diet, women, poverty, transparency, green cities among others.

via Worldchanging: Bright Green: Earth Day: 10 Big, Really Hard Things We Can Do to Save the Planet.